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Copyright © 2019 tec5USA | 80 Skyline Drive , Plainview, NY | Phone: (516) 653-2000

LIBS

(Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy)

  • Element specific quantitative analysis – provides a complete set of individual elements in the sample being studied

  • Relatively independent from phase and temperature of the material (solid, liquid, gaseous)

  • High sensitivity, LOD ~ 10-500 ppm

  • Fast measurement: approx. 100 measurements / sec

  • Real-time analyses, On-line, In-line, In Situ

What is LIBS

  • Atomic Emission Spectroscopy
    Focused laser pulses with intensities of 100 GW/cm create a direct transition of the  material into the plasma phase > 10,000 K

  • Plasma emits light containing discrete element-specific atomic emission lines that contain rich signals from the elemental content of the investigated specimen

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Advantages of LIBS

  • Element specific quantitative analysis – provides a complete set of individual elements in the sample being studied

  • Relatively independent from phase and temperature of the material (solid, liquid, gaseous)

  • High sensitivity, LOD ~ 10-500 ppm

  • Fast measurement: approx. 100 measurements / sec

  • Real-time analyses, On-line, In-line, In Situ

  • Micro-destructive - Ablation volumes ~Attoliter

  • Measurement from a distance possible, laser focus on material surface
    Spectral range typical 200-1000 nm
    No time-consuming sample preparation necessary

LIBS Applications

Material sorting: 

Inline LIBS equipment over material flows on conveyor belt, based on instant LIBS analysis result of elemental compositions

  • Mineral ores

  • Waste electronic and electronic equipment

  • Metal scrap alloys (Al, Mg, Ti, etc.)

  • Refractories 

Considerations, for mining applications:

  • Adequately sampling the surface of the mineral

  • Complexity of the matrix effects that result in variations of the atomic emission lines from different elements

  • Preparing representative samples with known concentrations (using conventional analytical tools) to match natural rock samples for quantitative analysis using chemometrics

  • Having appropriate depth of field to avoid problems with surface roughness

  • Resolving the heterogeneity effect of the samples

  • Model maintenance